TSMC

ITRI joins forces with TSMC and NYCU to develop next-gen MRAM technologies

Taiwan's Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) announced two new MRAM collaborations. The first one is with Taiwan's TSMC, for the development of SOT-MRAM array chips. The second collaboration is with National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University (NYCU) to develop magnetic memory technology that can perform across a wide operating temperature range of nearly 400 degrees Celsius.

Together with TSMC, ITRI is developing low-voltage and current SOT-MRAM, that features high write efficiecny and low write voltage. ITRI says that its SOT-MRAM achieves a writing speed of 0.4 nanoseconds and a high endurance of 7 trillion reads and writes. The memory also offers a data storage lifespan of over 10 years.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 28,2022

TSMC shows its eMRAM technology roadmap

During a presentation during Persistent Memory Summit, a new slide from TSMC was shown that describes the company's eMRAM roadmap:

TSMC memory roadmap (Persistant Mmemory Summit 2021)

As we already know, TSMC is offering 22nm eMRAM option as an eFlash alternative. The company is also looking to develop 14/12 nm eMRAM option to replace SRAM memory (this is interesting as before it was revealed that the company is developing 16nm MRAM). Finally eMRAM is touted as a possible replacement for configuration memory (eFUSE / OTP / Flash).

Read the full story Posted: May 06,2021

Gyrfalcon's new AI chip first to use TSMC's embedded MRAM

In June 2017 it was reported that Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) will start producing embedded MRAM in 2018 using a 22 nm process. In what may bet he first adoption of TSMC's eMRAM technology, AI accelerator startup Gyrfalcon Technology announced the commercial availability of its LightSpeeur 2802M, AI ASIC that include TSMC's eMRAM.

The 2802M ASIC has 40MB of eMRAM memory, which can support large AI models or multiple AI models within a single chip. Applications include image classification, voice identification, voice commands, facial recognition, pattern recognition and more.

Read the full story Posted: Dec 13,2018

TSMC to start eMRAM production in 2018

According to reports, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) is aiming to start producing embedded MRAM chips in 2018 using a 22 nm process. This will be initial "risk production" to gauge market reception.

TSMC production facility photo

TSMC also aims to start embedded RRAM chip production in 2019.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 08,2017

Taiwan's ITRI says MRAM might be available by the end of 2008

A government-funded Taiwanese research institute says it will have phase-change memory products out within three years, while another memory technology to rival DRAM (dynamic RAM), magnetoresistive RAM (MRAM), may be available by the end of 2008.

TSMC and ITRI are working on MRAM technology. The two have been awarded over 40 patents related to MRAM technology, said Chang. TSMC will likely have the technology ready and available for customers by the end of next year or early in 2009, he said.

MRAM combines the ability to retain data when power is shut off with fast processing speeds comparable to DRAM. DRAM is speedy, but it cannot retain data without electrical power.

Read the full story Posted: Oct 10,2007

TSMC, NEC, Toshiba describe novel MRAM cells

TSMC claims to have developed novel MRAM structures based on a 0.18-micron process and a pillar write word line (PWWL) cell. The company proposes to shrink the bit size by a "so-called ExtVia process" while reducing the writing current by a factor of two.

Toshiba and NEC jointly presented a paper on a low-power 6F2 MRAM based on a cross-point cell. The 1-megabit MRAM chip is said to have been manufactured in a 130-nm process and a 0.24 x 0.48-micron2 magnetic tunnel junction technology. The chip is said to have a 250-ns access time and 1.5-volt operations. "To suppress the sneak current, a cell design is proposed for the new (cross-point) cell with a hierarchical bit line architecture".

Read the full story Posted: Dec 13,2004