MRAM research or technical information

Intel is developing embedded MRAM technologies

Intel says it will present a new paper detailing its MRAM research at the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in early December 2018. This is the first time we hear of any MRAM R&D at Intel which is great news, even if it just a research paper.

Intel MTJ array 22nm (Oct 2018)

Intel has apparently successfully integrated embedded MRAM into the company's 22nm FinFET CMOS technology on full 300mm wafers. The magnetic tunnel junction-based memory cells are built from dual MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) separated by a CoFeB-based layer in a 1 transistor-1 resistor (1T-1R) configuration in the interconnect stack. Intel has manufactured a 7.2Mbit array with reported data retention figures in excess of 10 years and write endurance of greater than 10^6 cycles.

Researchers develop a sub 10-nm STT MTJ

Researchers from UC Berkeley and the Huazhong University of Science and Technology developed sub 10-nm STT MTJs that shows a thermal stability factor of more than 80.

The reserachers say that the highly efficient and dense MTJ could lead to higher efficiency and density STT-MRAM devices and spin-based computers.

New material could finally enable fast, efficient and dense SOT-MRAM devices

SOT-MRAM (spin-orbit torque MRAM) has the potential to challenge STT-MRAM, as it is a faster, denser and much more efficient memory technology. Up until now, though, no suitable material that features both high electrical conductivity and a high spin hall effect was developed.

Now researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a new thin film material made from bismuth-antimony (BiSb) that is a topological insulator that simultaneously achieves a colossal spin Hall effect and high electrical conductivity - which means it could be used to create SOT-devices.

Multi-layered Co/Ni films are highly desirable materials for effective spin transfer torque

Researchers from the University of Lorraine in France have discovered that multilayers films made of cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) hold great promise for STT-MRAM applications.

Multi layered cobalt and nickel films for spintronics

It was already shown before that Co/Ni multilayers have very good properties for spintronics applications, but up until now it wasn't clear if the films have a sufficiently large intrinsic spin polarization, which is necessary to create and maintain spin-polarized currents in spintronic devices. It was now shown that the films have a spin polarization of about 90% - which is similar to the best spintronic materials.

Imec researchers deposited SOT-MRAM devices on 300 mm wafers

Researchers from Imec fabricated spin-orbit torque MRAM (SOT-MRAM) devices on 300mm wafers using CMOS compatible processes. The researchers say that these devices offer unlimited endurance, fast switching speeds and low power consumption.

Imec says that SOT-MRAM can overcome the limitation of spin-transfer torque in MRAM memories, but up until now it was only demonstrated in a lab. The core of the SOT-MRAM is a magnetic tunnel junction in which a thin dielectric layer is sandwiched between a magnetic fixed layer and a magnetic free layer. SOT-MRAM devices feature switching of the free magnetic layer done by injecting an in-plane current in an adjacent SOT layer, unlike STT-MRAM where the current is injected perpendicularly into the magnetic tunnel junction and the read and write operation is performed through the same path.

Researchers develop a process to form single-crystal CMRs on metal wires

Researchers from Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) developed a new process, based on 3D stacking, that forms a single-crystal TMR device on a polycrystal metal wire.

3D TMR-MRAM stacking process (AIST)

The stacking process creates the TMR thin-film on a single-crystal silicon wafer and then bonds it to a CMOS on another wafer. This opens the way to using these materials in high-performance MRAM devices. The single-crystal TMRs reduces the variation in the device and can enable smaller TMRs. The researcher say that it will take up to 2 years to completely develop the new 3D stacking process.

The EU GREAT Project delivered its 2nd tape-out demonstrator

In 2015, the EU launched the GREAT project, with an aim to co-integrate multiple functions like sensors, RF receivers and logic/memory together within CMOS by adapting STT-MTJs to a single baseline technology in the same system on chip. GREAT stands for heteroGeneous integRated magnetic tEchnology using multifonctionnal stAndardized sTack.

GREAT Project 2nd tape-out photo

After the delivery of a first demonstrator in 2017, the project partners now announced the second hybrid CMOS/MSS-MRAM 180nm Tape Out at Israel-based Tower Jazz. The project partners designed four ICs to validate Analog IP blocks and an ultra-low power MCU comprising a hardware security block.

Spin Transfer Technologies announces a breakthrough new STT-MRAM technology

Spin Transfer Technologies (STT) announced that its unique Precessional Spin Current (PSC) structure can increase the spin-torque efficiency of any MRAM device by 40-70 percent, which means dramatically higher data retention while consuming less power.

Following advanced testing, the company says that these higher spin-torque efficiencies translate to retention times lengthening by a factor of over 10,000 while reducing write current.

Tohoku University develops ultra-small (<10nm) MTJs

Researchers from Tohoku University developed new ultra-small (single-digit nanometer scale) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) that have sufficient retention properties and yet can be switched by a current.

Shape anisotropy and interfacial anisotropy MTJs (Tohoku University)

Tohoku University developed 20-nm CoFeB/MgO-based MTJs in 2010, in which an "interfacial anisotropy" at the CoFeB/MgO interface was utilized. But these will not work at under 20-nm. The researchers now used a "shape anisotropy" to achieve the smaller MTJs.

Keysight Technology announces a new MRAM test platform designed in collaboration with Tohoku University

Tohoku University's Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic System (CIES) announced that its collaboration with Keysight Technology has led to the release of a new MRAM test platform product, the NX5730A.

Kesight NX5730A Memory Test system photo

Keysight's NX5730A is a high-throughput 1 ns Pulsed IV memory test solution. Keysight says that this solution is a unique dedicated system for characterizing emerging devices such as magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) on silicon wafers, accelerating the efficiency of device characterization and memory production testing.